ONE OF A KIND ARTIST’S BOOKS

I began making books in the late 1980s and continue to do so. With the many materials and processes I work with, I have found them to be the only structures in which I can successfully incorporate the myriad of materials and processes that interest me: metalworking, printmaking, writing, photography, woodworking, sewing, etc. The subject matter has ranged from autobiographical material to travel journals to portraits of loved ones to objects I collect. They act as a means of sharing, honoring, remembering, and postponing loss.

ONE OF A KIND ARTIST’S BOOKS

I began making books in the late 1980s and continue to do so. With the many materials and processes I work with, I have found them to be the only structures in which I can successfully incorporate the myriad of materials and processes that interest me: metalworking, printmaking, writing, photography, woodworking, sewing, etc. The subject matter has ranged from autobiographical material to travel journals to portraits of loved ones to objects I collect. They act as a means of sharing, honoring, remembering, and postponing loss.

ARCHAIC REMNANTS

I began writing down my dreams when I was 14 and continue to do so. From that grew an interest in Carl Jung’s theories about the “collective unconscious’” of the human race. Delving a bit deeper led me to Freud’s theory that there are elements of our psyche which have remained intact since before spoken language and are shared by all humans. He labeled them, “archaic remnants.’ The project, went on from 1990-1997 and consisted of wall hangings, books and prints using my own personal symbols and iconography. The bulk of the pieces were simple symbols and patterns printed on brown paper bags using a variety of techniques then waxed and sewn together.

ARCHAIC REMNANTS

I began writing down my dreams when I was 14 and continue to do so. From that grew an interest in Carl Jung’s theories about the “collective unconscious’” of the human race. Delving a bit deeper led me to Freud’s theory that there are elements of our psyche which have remained intact since before spoken language and are shared by all humans. He labeled them, “archaic remnants.’ The project, went on from 1990-1997 and consisted of wall hangings, books and prints using my own personal symbols and iconography. The bulk of the pieces were simple symbols and patterns printed on brown paper bags using a variety of techniques then waxed and sewn together.

TRIPTYCHS AND BOXES

For me, triptychs (three-panel hinged structures) and boxes are part of the same family as my books; viewer is presented with a façade (lid, cover, doors) that when opened reveals the world inside.

TRIPTYCHS AND BOXES

For me, triptychs (three-panel hinged structures) and boxes are part of the same family as my books; viewer is presented with a façade (lid, cover, doors) that when opened reveals the world inside.

ALTERNATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

Since the mid-1980s, I have researched, learned and experimented with a handful of techniques for printing photographs on unorthodox materials: wood, eggs, stones, fabric, and glass.

ALTERNATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

Since the mid-1980s, I have researched, learned and experimented with a handful of techniques for printing photographs on unorthodox materials: wood, eggs, stones, fabric, and glass.

JARS

Lately, when I’ve been showing my books and prints and wall pieces, I’ve begun to include an installation using the many jars I use for storing materials and preserving fragile, precious objects. Many of the jars are collections of raw materials waiting to find a place, others remain sealed, sometimes with beeswax, and act as shrines or reliquaries protecting, preserving and presenting the contents.

JARS

Lately, when I’ve been showing my books and prints and wall pieces, I’ve begun to include an installation using the many jars I use for storing materials and preserving fragile, precious objects. Many of the jars are collections of raw materials waiting to find a place, others remain sealed, sometimes with beeswax, and act as shrines or reliquaries protecting, preserving and presenting the contents.

CYANOTYPE

Cyanotype, also known as “blue printing” or “sun printing” was one of the first forms of photography used in the mid-1800s. I fell in love with the process 30 years ago and have had a tumultuous affair with it! Every time I think that I’ve exhausted all the possibilities, inevitably something new rears its head.

As they were done in the 19th century, I’ve used actual objects, essentially a “photogram,” photographic negatives and, most recently, handmade negatives for my on-going “Homework” project. I have experimented with a method of rinsing the blue print in a bath of very strong trisodium phosphate (soap) which turns the blue to an ochre color that can then be soaked in a bath of tannic acid (tea) to get a variety of sepia tones. Having perfected that, I’m now playing around with applying silver, copper or gold-leaf to selected areas of the prints.

CYANOTYPE

Cyanotype, also known as “blue printing” or “sun printing” was one of the first forms of photography used in the mid-1800s. I fell in love with the process 30 years ago and have had a tumultuous affair with it! Every time I think that I’ve exhausted all the possibilities, inevitably something new rears its head.

As they were done in the 19th century, I’ve used actual objects, essentially a “photogram,” photographic negatives and, most recently, handmade negatives for my on-going “Homework” project. I have experimented with a method of rinsing the blue print in a bath of very strong trisodium phosphate (soap) which turns the blue to an ochre color that can then be soaked in a bath of tannic acid (tea) to get a variety of sepia tones. Having perfected that, I’m now playing around with applying silver, copper or gold-leaf to selected areas of the prints.